Broadcasting and Radio Technology Museum

Historic monuments and sites , Industrial culture , Museums
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100 years of radio and broadcasting history at the place where it actually happened: Visit the cradle of German radio!
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  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen - Hörby, Foto: Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen - Sendesaal, Foto: Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen
  • Model der Antennenanlage Sender Königs Wusterhausen 1938/39, Foto: Tourismusverband Dahme-Seen e.V.
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen -Köpeneicker Röhre, Foto: Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen - Meilenstein, Foto: Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen
“Hello, hello - this is Königs Wusterhausen on 2700 wavelength”. These were the words that marked the dawn of a new era for Germany on December 22, 1920. Post office employees played a Christmas concert live in the temporary studio. Speech and music were broadcast as a compèred programme for the first time. Radio in its current form had been born. The historic broadcast was made from Transmitter Building 1 in the former Windmühlenberg, now called the Funkerberg, in Königs Wusterhausen. Today, a museum in the historic complex presents all sorts of exhibits from 100 years of radio.

The exhibition shows all the aspects of radio broadcasting from preparing the programmes via the transmitter and aerial to power supplier. The collection of completely surviving historic short-, medium- and long-wave transmitters – from the little radio repeater and medium-powered transmitters to large transmitters that fill an entire room – is unique. The authentically reconstructed medium-wave SM8/H1 transmitter with its massive control panel is particularly impressive. The system shows clearly what a vast amount of energy was needed to operate a transmitter of this type: The transmission power was 250,000 watts.

The fully functioning 1000 HP diesel engine which was once used to power a 6000 volt generator is a real rarity. No other museum worldwide has an operating diesel generator of this type. The system from the 1930s was used to provide electricity for the legendary “Transmitter 21”, the history of which is provided in the museum.

The landmark of the Funkerberg is “Mast 17”, which is 210 metres high. It is the oldest surviving aerial mount in Germany. The model of the Funkerberg on a scale of 1:200 illustrates the massive extent of the forest of aerials in Königs Wusterhausen, of which Mast 17 formed part. Another highlight is the collection of over 300 tubes, impressively presenting the beauty and diversity of these components. 

The “Aerial Tip House” in Transmission Building 1 houses the special exhibition on “German Radio Broadcasting”, with the subheading “There was only the Black Channel”. Around 700 photographs and a host of original props bring back memories of broadcasts from 39 years of television from Adlershof.

By the way: Broadcasts are still transmitted from the Funkerberg. At the museum’s radio station, “welle370”, visitors can watch radio broadcasters at work once a month.

Tip:

There are age-specific guided tours for young visitors, telling them why radio broadcasting is called that when there are electromagnetic waves right through it and how children listened to music 100 years ago.

Travel guides for a tour by S-Bahn (rapid transit train) and on foot in the footsteps of regional history - you’ll find everything you need for a successful day out here: Discovery Tour

For cyclists:
  • The “Broadcasting and Radio Technology Museum” is on the "Dahme Cycle Path".
  • Recommendation: “7 Bridges Bicycle Tour”

Continue readingcollapse
100 years of radio and broadcasting history at the place where it actually happened: Visit the cradle of German radio!
Continue readingcollapse
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen - Hörby, Foto: Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen - Sendesaal, Foto: Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen
  • Model der Antennenanlage Sender Königs Wusterhausen 1938/39, Foto: Tourismusverband Dahme-Seen e.V.
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen -Köpeneicker Röhre, Foto: Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen - Meilenstein, Foto: Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen
“Hello, hello - this is Königs Wusterhausen on 2700 wavelength”. These were the words that marked the dawn of a new era for Germany on December 22, 1920. Post office employees played a Christmas concert live in the temporary studio. Speech and music were broadcast as a compèred programme for the first time. Radio in its current form had been born. The historic broadcast was made from Transmitter Building 1 in the former Windmühlenberg, now called the Funkerberg, in Königs Wusterhausen. Today, a museum in the historic complex presents all sorts of exhibits from 100 years of radio.

The exhibition shows all the aspects of radio broadcasting from preparing the programmes via the transmitter and aerial to power supplier. The collection of completely surviving historic short-, medium- and long-wave transmitters – from the little radio repeater and medium-powered transmitters to large transmitters that fill an entire room – is unique. The authentically reconstructed medium-wave SM8/H1 transmitter with its massive control panel is particularly impressive. The system shows clearly what a vast amount of energy was needed to operate a transmitter of this type: The transmission power was 250,000 watts.

The fully functioning 1000 HP diesel engine which was once used to power a 6000 volt generator is a real rarity. No other museum worldwide has an operating diesel generator of this type. The system from the 1930s was used to provide electricity for the legendary “Transmitter 21”, the history of which is provided in the museum.

The landmark of the Funkerberg is “Mast 17”, which is 210 metres high. It is the oldest surviving aerial mount in Germany. The model of the Funkerberg on a scale of 1:200 illustrates the massive extent of the forest of aerials in Königs Wusterhausen, of which Mast 17 formed part. Another highlight is the collection of over 300 tubes, impressively presenting the beauty and diversity of these components. 

The “Aerial Tip House” in Transmission Building 1 houses the special exhibition on “German Radio Broadcasting”, with the subheading “There was only the Black Channel”. Around 700 photographs and a host of original props bring back memories of broadcasts from 39 years of television from Adlershof.

By the way: Broadcasts are still transmitted from the Funkerberg. At the museum’s radio station, “welle370”, visitors can watch radio broadcasters at work once a month.

Tip:

There are age-specific guided tours for young visitors, telling them why radio broadcasting is called that when there are electromagnetic waves right through it and how children listened to music 100 years ago.

Travel guides for a tour by S-Bahn (rapid transit train) and on foot in the footsteps of regional history - you’ll find everything you need for a successful day out here: Discovery Tour

For cyclists:
  • The “Broadcasting and Radio Technology Museum” is on the "Dahme Cycle Path".
  • Recommendation: “7 Bridges Bicycle Tour”

Continue readingcollapse

Arrival planner

Funkerberg 20 Senderhaus 1

15711 Königs Wusterhausen

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Tourist information

Tourismusverband Dahme Seenland e.V.

Bahnhofsvorplatz 5
15711 Königs Wusterhausen

Tel.: +49 (0) 3375-252025
Fax: +49 (0) 3375-252011

Weather Today, 2. 12.

-1 6
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

  • Friday
    -3 4
  • Saturday
    -0 4

All information, times and prices are regularly checked and updated. Nevertheless, we can not guarantee the accuracy of the data. We recommend that you inquire about the current status by phone / e-mail or via the provider's website before your visit.

(+49) +49(0)3312004747​ We are available for you via telephone: weekdays Mon – Fri 9 am – 1 pm and Oct. 31 from 9 am – 1 pm.

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We are also glad to answer all of your questions surrounding the State of Brandenburg at (+49)(0)331- 200 47 47. Please send us an e-mail at service@reiseland-brandenburg.de.

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