Forst (Lausitz) - Prussian Memorial Sites

Prussian places of memory
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Cloth and linen manufactory at the castle in Forst
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Until 1815, Forst was part of Saxony. Since 1746, the town – and the entire Lordship of Forst-Pförten in the Niederlausitz region – had belonged to Saxony’s prime minister Count Heinrich von Brühl (1700 – 1763). He implemented an administrative reform and arranged for a cloth and linen manufactory to be set up in the castle in Forst. This business was the foundation stone of the cloth-making industry in Forst that was to become very important. Following a big fire on July 12, 1748 that destroyed most of Forst, Brühl organised the town’s reconstruction.

Count Heinrich von Brühl: the rival of Frederick II.

Brühl was the most important political opponent of Frederick II on the Saxonian side, and he was also a vibrant personality. He was among the richest men and the third largest land owner in Saxony, after the Great Elector and August III. Count von Brühl was also in charge of the grand royal art collections, the opera house in Dresden and the porcelain manufactory in Meißen. The Prussian king hated him passionately, and had his estates plundered and devastated during the Seven Years’ War.

Final resting place at the Town Church of St Nicholas

Heinrich von Brühl was buried in the protestant Town Church of St Nicholas on November 4, 1763. His remains are here to this day, in a plain 19th century zinc casket (www.stadtkirche-forst.de).

Please note

A visit to the rose garden in Forst is highly recommended, even if the garden was created long after Heinrich von Brühl had died.

Neighbouring Brody (formerly Pförten) in Poland was home to Count Brühl’s main castle, whose ruins still exist. This “pearl of the Niederlausitz region” was created by well-known artists from Dresden on behalf of Count von Brühl. Frederick II set it on fire in 1758.

Brody, castle grounds

Schlosspark Brody, pl. Zamkowy 9, PL-68-343 Brody

Tel. +48 68 3712155

www.pfoerten.wordpress.com
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Cloth and linen manufactory at the castle in Forst
Continue readingcollapse
Until 1815, Forst was part of Saxony. Since 1746, the town – and the entire Lordship of Forst-Pförten in the Niederlausitz region – had belonged to Saxony’s prime minister Count Heinrich von Brühl (1700 – 1763). He implemented an administrative reform and arranged for a cloth and linen manufactory to be set up in the castle in Forst. This business was the foundation stone of the cloth-making industry in Forst that was to become very important. Following a big fire on July 12, 1748 that destroyed most of Forst, Brühl organised the town’s reconstruction.

Count Heinrich von Brühl: the rival of Frederick II.

Brühl was the most important political opponent of Frederick II on the Saxonian side, and he was also a vibrant personality. He was among the richest men and the third largest land owner in Saxony, after the Great Elector and August III. Count von Brühl was also in charge of the grand royal art collections, the opera house in Dresden and the porcelain manufactory in Meißen. The Prussian king hated him passionately, and had his estates plundered and devastated during the Seven Years’ War.

Final resting place at the Town Church of St Nicholas

Heinrich von Brühl was buried in the protestant Town Church of St Nicholas on November 4, 1763. His remains are here to this day, in a plain 19th century zinc casket (www.stadtkirche-forst.de).

Please note

A visit to the rose garden in Forst is highly recommended, even if the garden was created long after Heinrich von Brühl had died.

Neighbouring Brody (formerly Pförten) in Poland was home to Count Brühl’s main castle, whose ruins still exist. This “pearl of the Niederlausitz region” was created by well-known artists from Dresden on behalf of Count von Brühl. Frederick II set it on fire in 1758.

Brody, castle grounds

Schlosspark Brody, pl. Zamkowy 9, PL-68-343 Brody

Tel. +48 68 3712155

www.pfoerten.wordpress.com
Continue readingcollapse

Arrival planner

Cottbusser Straße 10

03149 Forst (Lausitz)

Weather Today, 29. 5.

5 17
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

  • Monday
    5 17
  • Tuesday
    6 21

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Tourist information

Tourismusverband Lausitzer Seenland e.V.

Am Stadthafen 2
01968 Senftenberg

Tel.: +49 (0) 3573-725300-0
Fax: +49 (0) 3573-725300-9

Weather Today, 29. 5.

5 17
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

  • Monday
    5 17
  • Tuesday
    6 21

All information, times and prices are regularly checked and updated. Nevertheless, we can not guarantee the accuracy of the data. We recommend that you inquire about the current status by phone / e-mail or via the provider's website before your visit.

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