"Kupferhammer" Copperworks

Industrial culture
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Unfortunately it’s not possible to enter this facility, but it’s worth taking a detour on a walk in order to take a look and get a better understanding of the town’s industrial history,
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as the construction of this copper hammer (‘Kupferhammer’ in German) in 1603 heralded the start of the industrial age in the Finowtal Valley.  In the very same year Elector Joachim Friedrich also commissioned the building of the first Finowkanal and purchased two rather unprofitable copper hammers from the town of Eberswalde, which he relocated from the River Schwärze to the Finow.

As production started at the facility, Friedrich had all private copper hammers closed and ordered all coppersmiths to obtain their material from here instead. This made Eberswalde’s copper hammer the coppersmithing centre of the Mark Brandenburg region. The local copper guild met regularly here from 1712 until the mid-19th century, and only in Eberswalde could local coppersmiths take their examination as master craftsmen. The Berlin bank and trading firm Splitgerber & Daum leased the facility from 1719 to 1786, a period that saw the plant flourish.  In the second half of the 18th  century around 1,100 hundredweights of copper products were smithed each year here, including copper cutlery, bathtubs, copper plates and sheets, machine parts and gun barrels for the Prussian Army. Special commissions were also produced:  The Kupferhammer supplied the boiler for the first steam engine built in Germany, which was put into operation in the year 1785.

Free enterprise was introduced in 1810 and the plant lost its monopoly. As part of extensive modernisation work guided by the state to ensure the plant remained competitive, a new mill building was constructed between 1816 and 1818 in the Eisenspalterei (ironworks), featuring a classical facade and a steam engine. The production of copper finally came to an end with the outbreak of the First World War and,  after being used for a short time as a silver mill, the water wheels began to produce power for the local ironworks.  The facility began to decay after the end of the Second World War, but to this day the Kupferhammer lends its name to a town district.
Continue readingcollapse
Unfortunately it’s not possible to enter this facility, but it’s worth taking a detour on a walk in order to take a look and get a better understanding of the town’s industrial history,
Continue readingcollapse
as the construction of this copper hammer (‘Kupferhammer’ in German) in 1603 heralded the start of the industrial age in the Finowtal Valley.  In the very same year Elector Joachim Friedrich also commissioned the building of the first Finowkanal and purchased two rather unprofitable copper hammers from the town of Eberswalde, which he relocated from the River Schwärze to the Finow.

As production started at the facility, Friedrich had all private copper hammers closed and ordered all coppersmiths to obtain their material from here instead. This made Eberswalde’s copper hammer the coppersmithing centre of the Mark Brandenburg region. The local copper guild met regularly here from 1712 until the mid-19th century, and only in Eberswalde could local coppersmiths take their examination as master craftsmen. The Berlin bank and trading firm Splitgerber & Daum leased the facility from 1719 to 1786, a period that saw the plant flourish.  In the second half of the 18th  century around 1,100 hundredweights of copper products were smithed each year here, including copper cutlery, bathtubs, copper plates and sheets, machine parts and gun barrels for the Prussian Army. Special commissions were also produced:  The Kupferhammer supplied the boiler for the first steam engine built in Germany, which was put into operation in the year 1785.

Free enterprise was introduced in 1810 and the plant lost its monopoly. As part of extensive modernisation work guided by the state to ensure the plant remained competitive, a new mill building was constructed between 1816 and 1818 in the Eisenspalterei (ironworks), featuring a classical facade and a steam engine. The production of copper finally came to an end with the outbreak of the First World War and,  after being used for a short time as a silver mill, the water wheels began to produce power for the local ironworks.  The facility began to decay after the end of the Second World War, but to this day the Kupferhammer lends its name to a town district.
Continue readingcollapse

Arrival planner

Britzer Str. 14

16225 Eberswalde

Weather Today, 16. 4.

4 10
light rain

  • Wednesday
    2 9
  • Thursday
    -0 11

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Tourist information

WITO Barnim GmbH

Alfred-Nobel-Str. 1
16225 Eberswalde

Tel.: +49 (0) 3334-59100
Fax: +49 (0) 3334-59222

Weather Today, 16. 4.

4 10
light rain

  • Wednesday
    2 9
  • Thursday
    -0 11

All information, times and prices are regularly checked and updated. Nevertheless, we can not guarantee the accuracy of the data. We recommend that you inquire about the current status by phone / e-mail or via the provider's website before your visit.

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