Königs Wusterhausen Broadcasting and Radio Technology Museum

Memorials of recent German history
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In the Königs Wusterhausen Broadcasting and Radio Technology Museum, a historic photograph shows six very serious-looking musicians with their instruments in an improvised recording studio. Their concert marks a milestone in the history of radio transmission and made the Funkerberg in Königs Wusterhausen internationally famous. After the words “Hello, hello - this is Königs Wusterhausen on 2700 wavelength”, a Christmas concert was broadcast on December 22, 1922 by the broadcaster operated by the German Reichspost. Music and the spoken word were transmitted across the ether for the first time. More of these Sunday concerts on the radio were to follow. Since then, the town has been considered the “cradle of radio” in Germany.
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  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen; Foto: © Tourismusverband Dahme-Seen e.V
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen; Foto: © Tourismusverband Dahme-Seen e.V
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen; Foto: © Tourismusverband Dahme-Seen e.V
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen, Foto: Tourismusverband Dahme-Seen e.V
The hill known as the “Funkerberg”, where the military had already carried out tests with electric arc transmitters before the First World War, enjoyed an unprecedented rise as a broadcasting location in the time that followed. The idea of “radio for everyone” that Secretary of State Hans Bredow had developed began to take shape. By the mid-1920s, the site already housed three fully equipped transmission buildings, a host of broadcasting towers and aerial masts. With the modern long-wave and short-wave transmitters later built in Zeesen, Königs Wusterhausen consolidated its role as an important radio location.

Under the National Socialists, who used the medium of radio for their propaganda, the location of Zeesen was expanded by the addition of more transmitter buildings. After the end of the War, which the transmitters had survived almost unharmed, the Soviet Occupying Powers had large parts of the systems removed as reparation payments. A replacement came from Tegel: With a medium-wave transmitter that had been dismantled there, Berlin Radio was able to start operating from the Funkerberg from 1945. This “Transmitter 21” was used until 1992.

On the site today, the Königs Wusterhausen Radio Technology Museum provides information about the history of the complex and the technical equipment that has survived.

Literature:
  • Förderverein „Sender Königs Wusterhausen“ e.V. (Hg.), ... Hier Königs Wusterhausen auf Welle 2700 ... . Beiträge zur Funkgeschichte in Königs Wusterhausen, 4. überarbeitete Aufl., Königs Wusterhausen 2014.
  • Thomas Riegler, Meilensteine des Rundfunks. Daten und Fakten zur Entwicklung des Radios und Fernsehens, Baden Baden 2006.

Continue readingcollapse
In the Königs Wusterhausen Broadcasting and Radio Technology Museum, a historic photograph shows six very serious-looking musicians with their instruments in an improvised recording studio. Their concert marks a milestone in the history of radio transmission and made the Funkerberg in Königs Wusterhausen internationally famous. After the words “Hello, hello - this is Königs Wusterhausen on 2700 wavelength”, a Christmas concert was broadcast on December 22, 1922 by the broadcaster operated by the German Reichspost. Music and the spoken word were transmitted across the ether for the first time. More of these Sunday concerts on the radio were to follow. Since then, the town has been considered the “cradle of radio” in Germany.
Continue readingcollapse
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen; Foto: © Tourismusverband Dahme-Seen e.V
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen; Foto: © Tourismusverband Dahme-Seen e.V
  • Sender- und Funktechnikmuseum Königs Wusterhausen; Foto: © Tourismusverband Dahme-Seen e.V
The hill known as the “Funkerberg”, where the military had already carried out tests with electric arc transmitters before the First World War, enjoyed an unprecedented rise as a broadcasting location in the time that followed. The idea of “radio for everyone” that Secretary of State Hans Bredow had developed began to take shape. By the mid-1920s, the site already housed three fully equipped transmission buildings, a host of broadcasting towers and aerial masts. With the modern long-wave and short-wave transmitters later built in Zeesen, Königs Wusterhausen consolidated its role as an important radio location.

Under the National Socialists, who used the medium of radio for their propaganda, the location of Zeesen was expanded by the addition of more transmitter buildings. After the end of the War, which the transmitters had survived almost unharmed, the Soviet Occupying Powers had large parts of the systems removed as reparation payments. A replacement came from Tegel: With a medium-wave transmitter that had been dismantled there, Berlin Radio was able to start operating from the Funkerberg from 1945. This “Transmitter 21” was used until 1992.

On the site today, the Königs Wusterhausen Radio Technology Museum provides information about the history of the complex and the technical equipment that has survived.

Literature:
  • Förderverein „Sender Königs Wusterhausen“ e.V. (Hg.), ... Hier Königs Wusterhausen auf Welle 2700 ... . Beiträge zur Funkgeschichte in Königs Wusterhausen, 4. überarbeitete Aufl., Königs Wusterhausen 2014.
  • Thomas Riegler, Meilensteine des Rundfunks. Daten und Fakten zur Entwicklung des Radios und Fernsehens, Baden Baden 2006.

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Arrival planner

Funkerberg 20

15711 Königs Wusterhausen

Weather Today, 19. 8.

20 26
Possible light rain in the morning and afternoon.

  • Saturday
    18 24
  • Sunday
    16 26

Brochures

Tourist information

Tourismusverband Dahme Seenland e.V.

Bahnhofsvorplatz 5
15711 Königs Wusterhausen

Tel.: +49 (0) 3375-252025
Fax: +49 (0) 3375-252011

Weather Today, 19. 8.

20 26
Possible light rain in the morning and afternoon.

  • Saturday
    18 24
  • Sunday
    16 26

All information, times and prices are regularly checked and updated. Nevertheless, we can not guarantee the accuracy of the data. We recommend that you inquire about the current status by phone / e-mail or via the provider's website before your visit.

(+49) +49(0)3312004747​ We are available for you via telephone: weekdays Mon – Fri 9 am – 1 pm and Oct. 31 from 9 am – 1 pm.

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