Einsteinhaus Caputh

Memorials of recent German history
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p.P. = per person, p.P./N = per person / night, p.E./N = per unit / night, EZ = Single room, DZ = double room, FeWo = holiday home, App. = apartment, Suite = suite, FR = Breakfast, HP = half board, VP = full board
‘Be a good lazy animal and put your feet up. Come to Caputh, whistle at the world and at your dad if you like.’ It was with these whimsical words that Albert Einstein invited his son Eduard to his new summer retreat near Potsdam. The Nobel Prize-winning genius physicist with the crazy hair had had the young architect Konrad Wachsmann construct the modern wooden building with a view of the Havel landscape in 1929. The Einsteins spent a large amount of the year in Caputh until 1932. Einstein used the remoteness of the country location for research, indulged in his passion for sailing, and received friends and colleagues there. Concerned about the threat posed by Hitler coming to power, after going to the USA on a lecture trip in 1933 Einstein didn’t return to Germany.
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Einstein’s Summer House was used by the neighbouring Jewish school and children’s home for two years until it was confiscated by the Nazi regime in 1935. The school, led by the progressive educator Gertrud Feiertag, was bursting at the seams as Jewish children were driven out of ‘Aryan’ schools. The SS allowed the school to remain open under the condition that it made preparations to emigrate to Palestine. This ended with the school’s destruction in November 1938. Konrad Wachsmann also managed to emigrate to the USA after Einstein. Gertrud Feiertag, however, was murdered at Auschwitz in 1943.

After the war, the occupying Soviet forces briefly hoped that the world-famous physicist would return to Caputh, but these hopes were soon dashed. Even after Einstein’s death in 1955 his wishes were respected, and no museum was created in his honour at the house. Einstein’s Summer House was restored in 2004 and 2005, however, and is available for conferences, while the Caputh Community Centre presents an exhibition on Einstein, his summer house and its architect Konrad Wachsmann. It is possible to visit Einstein’s Summer House on a guided tour in the spring and summer.

Literature:
  • Dietmar Strauch, Einsteins Sommeridyll in Caputh, Berlin 2015.
  • Hildegard Feidel-Mertz/Andreas Paetz, Das Jüdische Kinder- und Landschulheim Caputh, 1931-1938. Ein verlorenes Paradies, Bad Heilbrunn 2009.

Continue readingcollapse
‘Be a good lazy animal and put your feet up. Come to Caputh, whistle at the world and at your dad if you like.’ It was with these whimsical words that Albert Einstein invited his son Eduard to his new summer retreat near Potsdam. The Nobel Prize-winning genius physicist with the crazy hair had had the young architect Konrad Wachsmann construct the modern wooden building with a view of the Havel landscape in 1929. The Einsteins spent a large amount of the year in Caputh until 1932. Einstein used the remoteness of the country location for research, indulged in his passion for sailing, and received friends and colleagues there. Concerned about the threat posed by Hitler coming to power, after going to the USA on a lecture trip in 1933 Einstein didn’t return to Germany.
Continue readingcollapse
Einstein’s Summer House was used by the neighbouring Jewish school and children’s home for two years until it was confiscated by the Nazi regime in 1935. The school, led by the progressive educator Gertrud Feiertag, was bursting at the seams as Jewish children were driven out of ‘Aryan’ schools. The SS allowed the school to remain open under the condition that it made preparations to emigrate to Palestine. This ended with the school’s destruction in November 1938. Konrad Wachsmann also managed to emigrate to the USA after Einstein. Gertrud Feiertag, however, was murdered at Auschwitz in 1943.

After the war, the occupying Soviet forces briefly hoped that the world-famous physicist would return to Caputh, but these hopes were soon dashed. Even after Einstein’s death in 1955 his wishes were respected, and no museum was created in his honour at the house. Einstein’s Summer House was restored in 2004 and 2005, however, and is available for conferences, while the Caputh Community Centre presents an exhibition on Einstein, his summer house and its architect Konrad Wachsmann. It is possible to visit Einstein’s Summer House on a guided tour in the spring and summer.

Literature:
  • Dietmar Strauch, Einsteins Sommeridyll in Caputh, Berlin 2015.
  • Hildegard Feidel-Mertz/Andreas Paetz, Das Jüdische Kinder- und Landschulheim Caputh, 1931-1938. Ein verlorenes Paradies, Bad Heilbrunn 2009.

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Arrival planner

Am Waldrand 15-17

14548 Potsdam

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Tourismusverband Havelland e.V.

Theodor-Fontane-Straße 10
14641 Nauen OT Ribbeck

Tel.: +49 (0) 33237-859030
Fax: +49 (0) 33237-859040

Weather Today, 30. 11.

1 6
Overcast throughout the day.

  • Thursday
    -1 3
  • Friday
    -2 3

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