Neuhardenberg Palace

Memorials of recent German history
0 Ratings of 5 (0)
0
0
0
0
0
How did you like your stay? You have already rated your stay.
From €
Show availability & price

p.P. = per person, p.P./N = per person / night, p.E./N = per unit / night, EZ = Single room, DZ = double room, FeWo = holiday home, App. = apartment, Suite = suite, FR = Breakfast, HP = half board, VP = full board
“We had to take active steps and break with everything we had been taught by our fathers to do with the honour of a Prussian-German soldier” – this was how Carl Hans Graf von Hardenberg described in retrospect his decision to join the resistance against Hitler. After his return from the front in Russia in 1942, the aristocrat became an important liaison for the members of the conspiracy of July 20, 1944 under Claus Schenk von Stauffenberg. His palace in Neuhardenberg, 70 kilometres north-east of Berlin, was a frequent meeting place for resistance members. At this secluded place, safe from the Gestapo, important meetings were held in preparation for the planned assassination attempt on Hitler.
Continue readingcollapse
  • Schlossensemble Neuhardenberg,  Foto: Kraftwerk
  • Schlossensemble Neuhardenberg,  Foto: Kraftwerk
  • Schlossensemble Neuhardenberg,  Foto: Kraftwerk
  • Luftbild des Schlosses Neuhardenberg, Foto: Kraftwerk
Neuhardenberg owes its name to the Prussian State Chancellor and reformer Karl August Prince von Hardenberg, who had been given the site – including the palace and agricultural estates – by King Frederick William III in 1814. The palace, which was rebuilt by Friedrich Schinkel from 1820 onwards, the park designed by Peter Joseph Lenné and the church, also designed by Schinkel, gave the village a distinctive character. Carl Hans Graf von Hardenberg, the last lord of the palace, was a great-great-great-nephew of the State Chancellor.

After the failed assassination attempt on Hitler, Hardenberg was arrested by the Gestapo in Neuhardenberg on the evening of July 24, 1944 having tried to escape arrest by committing suicide. Seriously injured, he was sent to Sachsenhausen concentration camp and survived. His possessions were confiscated by the Gestapo in 1944. Immediately after the end of the war, Hardenberg was expropriated as a “large landowner” as part of the land reform and went to the west with his family.

In 1949 the village was renamed Marxwalde in honour of Karl Marx. An agricultural production cooperative used the former estates. The palace housed a school until the 1970s. Marxwalde then became an important military base due to the stationing of a squadron of fighters of the East German army. After the end of the GDR, the palace and land were returned to the Hardenberg family, who sold it to the Sparkassen- und Giroverband (bank association) in 1996. Having undergone extensive renovation measures, the palace now houses a hotel and meeting centre. Exhibitions, theatre performances, readings and concerts are regularly held there.

Literature:
  • Günter Agde (ed.), Carl-Hans Graf von Hardenberg. Ein deutsches Schicksal im Widerstand, Berlin 2004
  • Gerd-Ulrich Herrmann, Fred Nespethal, Ulrich Pfeil, Märkische Herrensitze im Wandel der Zeiten: Neuhardenberg, Gusow, Friedersdorf and Sonnenburg, Petersberg 2002

Continue readingcollapse
“We had to take active steps and break with everything we had been taught by our fathers to do with the honour of a Prussian-German soldier” – this was how Carl Hans Graf von Hardenberg described in retrospect his decision to join the resistance against Hitler. After his return from the front in Russia in 1942, the aristocrat became an important liaison for the members of the conspiracy of July 20, 1944 under Claus Schenk von Stauffenberg. His palace in Neuhardenberg, 70 kilometres north-east of Berlin, was a frequent meeting place for resistance members. At this secluded place, safe from the Gestapo, important meetings were held in preparation for the planned assassination attempt on Hitler.
Continue readingcollapse
  • Schlossensemble Neuhardenberg,  Foto: Kraftwerk
  • Schlossensemble Neuhardenberg,  Foto: Kraftwerk
  • Schlossensemble Neuhardenberg,  Foto: Kraftwerk
Neuhardenberg owes its name to the Prussian State Chancellor and reformer Karl August Prince von Hardenberg, who had been given the site – including the palace and agricultural estates – by King Frederick William III in 1814. The palace, which was rebuilt by Friedrich Schinkel from 1820 onwards, the park designed by Peter Joseph Lenné and the church, also designed by Schinkel, gave the village a distinctive character. Carl Hans Graf von Hardenberg, the last lord of the palace, was a great-great-great-nephew of the State Chancellor.

After the failed assassination attempt on Hitler, Hardenberg was arrested by the Gestapo in Neuhardenberg on the evening of July 24, 1944 having tried to escape arrest by committing suicide. Seriously injured, he was sent to Sachsenhausen concentration camp and survived. His possessions were confiscated by the Gestapo in 1944. Immediately after the end of the war, Hardenberg was expropriated as a “large landowner” as part of the land reform and went to the west with his family.

In 1949 the village was renamed Marxwalde in honour of Karl Marx. An agricultural production cooperative used the former estates. The palace housed a school until the 1970s. Marxwalde then became an important military base due to the stationing of a squadron of fighters of the East German army. After the end of the GDR, the palace and land were returned to the Hardenberg family, who sold it to the Sparkassen- und Giroverband (bank association) in 1996. Having undergone extensive renovation measures, the palace now houses a hotel and meeting centre. Exhibitions, theatre performances, readings and concerts are regularly held there.

Literature:
  • Günter Agde (ed.), Carl-Hans Graf von Hardenberg. Ein deutsches Schicksal im Widerstand, Berlin 2004
  • Gerd-Ulrich Herrmann, Fred Nespethal, Ulrich Pfeil, Märkische Herrensitze im Wandel der Zeiten: Neuhardenberg, Gusow, Friedersdorf and Sonnenburg, Petersberg 2002

Continue readingcollapse

Arrival planner

Schinkelplatz

15320 Neuhardenberg

Weather Today, 4. 12.

-1 4
Overcast throughout the day.

  • Monday
    0 5
  • Tuesday
    1 5

Brochures

Tourist information

Tourismusverband Seenland Oder-Spree e.V.

Ulmenstraße 15
15526 Bad Saarow

Tel.: +49 (0) 33631-868100
Fax: +49 (0) 33631-868102

Weather Today, 4. 12.

-1 4
Overcast throughout the day.

  • Monday
    0 5
  • Tuesday
    1 5

All information, times and prices are regularly checked and updated. Nevertheless, we can not guarantee the accuracy of the data. We recommend that you inquire about the current status by phone / e-mail or via the provider's website before your visit.

(+49) +49(0)3312004747​ We are available for you via telephone: weekdays Mon – Fri 9 am – 1 pm and Oct. 31 from 9 am – 1 pm.

Thank you for your enquiry!

In case your enquiry did not result in a booking, we will be getting in touch with you as quickly as possible during our service hours from Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.

We are also glad to answer all of your questions surrounding the State of Brandenburg at (+49)(0)331- 200 47 47. Please send us an e-mail at service@reiseland-brandenburg.de.

Your information and travel agency service Brandenburg

Your request was not successful!

Please try again later. Thank you.

Your information and travel agency service Brandenburg

Online booking


Thank you for visiting www.brandenburg-tourism.com

This website has been developed with the latest technology. Unfortunately, you are using a browser that does not meet the latest technical requirements.

We therefore ask you to use an alternative browser (E.g. Google Chrome, Firefox or Edge) and we hope you enjoy browsing our website.