Seelower Höhen Memorial Site

Memorials of recent German history
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The Oderbruch stretches for miles in front of the town of Seelow, which is situated on a range of hills in the Brandenburg Marches. Anyone who has passed the town in the direction of Kostrzyn in order to reach the German-Polish border via Bundesstrasse 1 will inevitably be struck by this monumental memorial to a Soviet soldier which is more than four metres high and symbolically supported by a destroyed German tank. The monument, erected immediately after the victory over Nazi Germany, forms part of Seelower Höhen Memorial Site, as does the neighbouring Soviet military cemetery. It is a reminder that the history of the Oderbruch was not only shaped by its cultivation during the era of Frederick II, but that in spring 1945 it was the backdrop to one of the key battles in the final phase of the Second World War. Here on the River Oder, 100 kilometres from the capital of the Reich, one of the last great defensive battles took place between the German Wehrmacht and the advancing Red Army. 
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  • Ehrenmal Gedenkstätte Seelower Höhen, Foto: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen Lehmann
  • Gedenkstätte Seelower Höhen, Foto: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen Lehmann
On April 16, 1945, the troops of the 1st Belorussian Front under Marshall Shukov started a large-scale offensive with which the Soviet Army launched its operation to regain control of Berlin. The Wehrmacht units had been transferred to prepared positions on the Seelow Heights in anticipation of the attack. After two days of bitter fighting on the softened terrain, Soviet troops finally broke through the German lines of defence. The losses on both sides were considerable: all in all, more than 33,000 Soviet soldiers and 12,000 German soldiers died. With the collapse of the German front, the path was clear for the conquest of the capital. The Seelow Heights were the “key to Berlin”. Numerous sites in the Oderbruch landscape were almost completely destroyed by the war. War dead and explosive ordnance continue to be recovered in the area to this day.

In addition to the historical events of 1945, the exhibition also focuses on the culture of remembrance.

Literature:
  • Gerd-Ulrich Herrmann/Uwe Klar, Der Schlüssel für Berlin. Hintergründe, Vorbereitung und Verlauf der Schlacht um die Seelower Höhen, Aachen 2010.
  • Gerd-Ulrich Herrmann, Die Schlacht um die Seelower Höhen. Erinnerungsorte beiderseits der Oder, Berlin 2015.
  • Richard Lakowski: Die Entscheidungsschlacht an der Oder, Hamburg 2015

Continue readingcollapse
The Oderbruch stretches for miles in front of the town of Seelow, which is situated on a range of hills in the Brandenburg Marches. Anyone who has passed the town in the direction of Kostrzyn in order to reach the German-Polish border via Bundesstrasse 1 will inevitably be struck by this monumental memorial to a Soviet soldier which is more than four metres high and symbolically supported by a destroyed German tank. The monument, erected immediately after the victory over Nazi Germany, forms part of Seelower Höhen Memorial Site, as does the neighbouring Soviet military cemetery. It is a reminder that the history of the Oderbruch was not only shaped by its cultivation during the era of Frederick II, but that in spring 1945 it was the backdrop to one of the key battles in the final phase of the Second World War. Here on the River Oder, 100 kilometres from the capital of the Reich, one of the last great defensive battles took place between the German Wehrmacht and the advancing Red Army. 
Continue readingcollapse
  • Ehrenmal Gedenkstätte Seelower Höhen, Foto: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen Lehmann
  • Gedenkstätte Seelower Höhen, Foto: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen Lehmann
On April 16, 1945, the troops of the 1st Belorussian Front under Marshall Shukov started a large-scale offensive with which the Soviet Army launched its operation to regain control of Berlin. The Wehrmacht units had been transferred to prepared positions on the Seelow Heights in anticipation of the attack. After two days of bitter fighting on the softened terrain, Soviet troops finally broke through the German lines of defence. The losses on both sides were considerable: all in all, more than 33,000 Soviet soldiers and 12,000 German soldiers died. With the collapse of the German front, the path was clear for the conquest of the capital. The Seelow Heights were the “key to Berlin”. Numerous sites in the Oderbruch landscape were almost completely destroyed by the war. War dead and explosive ordnance continue to be recovered in the area to this day.

In addition to the historical events of 1945, the exhibition also focuses on the culture of remembrance.

Literature:
  • Gerd-Ulrich Herrmann/Uwe Klar, Der Schlüssel für Berlin. Hintergründe, Vorbereitung und Verlauf der Schlacht um die Seelower Höhen, Aachen 2010.
  • Gerd-Ulrich Herrmann, Die Schlacht um die Seelower Höhen. Erinnerungsorte beiderseits der Oder, Berlin 2015.
  • Richard Lakowski: Die Entscheidungsschlacht an der Oder, Hamburg 2015

Continue readingcollapse

Arrival planner

Küstriner Straße 28a

15306 Seelow

Weather Today, 9. 12.

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Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

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Brochures

Tourist information

Tourismusverband Seenland Oder-Spree e.V.

Ulmenstraße 15
15526 Bad Saarow

Tel.: +49 (0) 33631-868100
Fax: +49 (0) 33631-868102

Weather Today, 9. 12.

-3 1
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

  • Saturday
    -3 0
  • Sunday
    -5 -1

All information, times and prices are regularly checked and updated. Nevertheless, we can not guarantee the accuracy of the data. We recommend that you inquire about the current status by phone / e-mail or via the provider's website before your visit.

(+49) +49(0)3312004747​ We are available for you via telephone: weekdays Mon – Fri 9 am – 1 pm and Oct. 31 from 9 am – 1 pm.

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