Socialist planned city – Eisenhüttenstadt

Memorials of recent German history
0 Ratings of 5 (0)
0
0
0
0
0
How did you like your stay? You have already rated your stay.
From €
Show availability & price

p.P. = per person, p.P./N = per person / night, p.E./N = per unit / night, EZ = Single room, DZ = double room, FeWo = holiday home, App. = apartment, Suite = suite, FR = Breakfast, HP = half board, VP = full board
“It was built by the communists in 1953 to show people how great life was under socialism”: these were the words used by actor Tom Hanks to describe Eisenhüttenstadt to an American television audience. Though somewhat simplified, this characterisation actually hits the nail on the head – at least if it is taken to relate solely to the area of the socialist planned city built in the 1950s. 
Continue readingcollapse
  • Friedrich-Wolf-Theater, Foto: Steffen Gewohn
  • Leninallee, Foto: Stadtarchiv Eisenhüttenstadt / M. Fricke
  • Straße des Komsomol, Foto: Stadtarchiv Eisenhüttenstadt / M. Fricke
  • Leninallee, Foto: Stadtarchiv Eisenhüttenstadt / M. Fricke
  • Friedrich-Engels-Straße, Foto: Stadtarchiv Eisenhüttenstadt / M. Fricke
  • Rathaus von Eisenhüttenstadt, Foto: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen Lehmann
At its Third Party Congress in July 1950, the SED – East Germany’s Socialist Unity Party – decided to build Eisenhüttenkombinat Ost (Ironworks Combine East), directly on the River Oder near the town of Fürstenberg. The ground-breaking ceremony took place a little later, and in 1951 construction work began on the socialist planned city not far from the site of the combine. The fact that the town was considered exemplary is also demonstrated by the fact that it was given the honorary name of “Stalinstadt" in 1953: this name was not withdrawn until November 1961 when Fürstenberg (Oder) and Schönfließ were merged to form Eisenhüttenstadt. 

Stalinstadt was the first newly established German town after the Second World War and was equipped with everything a town needed according to the socialist philosophy: a cultural centre, a town hall, kindergartens, schools and sports grounds, a hotel and also a main road with department stores and other shops. All buildings were constructed in the "classicist" style (the so-called “gingerbread style”). As early as 1960, almost 25,000 people lived in the generously laid-out city with its lushly planted inner courtyards. Today, it is the largest monument of its kind in Germany.

Since 1994 the former crèche – part of Residential Complex II – has been home to the documentation centre “Everyday Culture in the GDR”, which includes a permanent exhibition on everyday life in the German Democrat Republic including details of the history of the socialist planned city. In the staircase of the museum building you can see the glass mosaic “From the Life of Children” by Walter Womacka. Visitors can obtain further information on the “socialist planned city” at Eisenhüttenstadt Municipal Museum.

Literature:
  • Rosmarie Beier (ed.), Aufbau West – Aufbau Ost. Die Planstädte Wolfsburg und Eisenhüttenstadt in der Nachkriegszeit, wissenschaftlicher Begleitband zur gleichnamigen Ausstellung, Stuttgart 1997.
  • Andreas Ludwig, Eisenhüttenstadt. Wandel einer industriellen Gründungsstadt in fünfzig Jahren, Brandenburger historische Hefte Nr. 14, Potsdam 2000

Continue readingcollapse
“It was built by the communists in 1953 to show people how great life was under socialism”: these were the words used by actor Tom Hanks to describe Eisenhüttenstadt to an American television audience. Though somewhat simplified, this characterisation actually hits the nail on the head – at least if it is taken to relate solely to the area of the socialist planned city built in the 1950s. 
Continue readingcollapse
  • Friedrich-Wolf-Theater, Foto: Steffen Gewohn
  • Leninallee, Foto: Stadtarchiv Eisenhüttenstadt / M. Fricke
  • Straße des Komsomol, Foto: Stadtarchiv Eisenhüttenstadt / M. Fricke
  • Leninallee, Foto: Stadtarchiv Eisenhüttenstadt / M. Fricke
  • Friedrich-Engels-Straße, Foto: Stadtarchiv Eisenhüttenstadt / M. Fricke
At its Third Party Congress in July 1950, the SED – East Germany’s Socialist Unity Party – decided to build Eisenhüttenkombinat Ost (Ironworks Combine East), directly on the River Oder near the town of Fürstenberg. The ground-breaking ceremony took place a little later, and in 1951 construction work began on the socialist planned city not far from the site of the combine. The fact that the town was considered exemplary is also demonstrated by the fact that it was given the honorary name of “Stalinstadt" in 1953: this name was not withdrawn until November 1961 when Fürstenberg (Oder) and Schönfließ were merged to form Eisenhüttenstadt. 

Stalinstadt was the first newly established German town after the Second World War and was equipped with everything a town needed according to the socialist philosophy: a cultural centre, a town hall, kindergartens, schools and sports grounds, a hotel and also a main road with department stores and other shops. All buildings were constructed in the "classicist" style (the so-called “gingerbread style”). As early as 1960, almost 25,000 people lived in the generously laid-out city with its lushly planted inner courtyards. Today, it is the largest monument of its kind in Germany.

Since 1994 the former crèche – part of Residential Complex II – has been home to the documentation centre “Everyday Culture in the GDR”, which includes a permanent exhibition on everyday life in the German Democrat Republic including details of the history of the socialist planned city. In the staircase of the museum building you can see the glass mosaic “From the Life of Children” by Walter Womacka. Visitors can obtain further information on the “socialist planned city” at Eisenhüttenstadt Municipal Museum.

Literature:
  • Rosmarie Beier (ed.), Aufbau West – Aufbau Ost. Die Planstädte Wolfsburg und Eisenhüttenstadt in der Nachkriegszeit, wissenschaftlicher Begleitband zur gleichnamigen Ausstellung, Stuttgart 1997.
  • Andreas Ludwig, Eisenhüttenstadt. Wandel einer industriellen Gründungsstadt in fünfzig Jahren, Brandenburger historische Hefte Nr. 14, Potsdam 2000

Continue readingcollapse

Arrival planner

Zentraler Platz

15890 Eisenhüttenstadt

Weather Today, 9. 8.

15 28
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

  • Wednesday
    13 29
  • Thursday
    15 30

Brochures

Tourist information

Tourismusverband Seenland Oder-Spree e.V.

Ulmenstraße 15
15526 Bad Saarow

Tel.: +49 (0) 33631-868100
Fax: +49 (0) 33631-868102

Weather Today, 9. 8.

15 28
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

  • Wednesday
    13 29
  • Thursday
    15 30

All information, times and prices are regularly checked and updated. Nevertheless, we can not guarantee the accuracy of the data. We recommend that you inquire about the current status by phone / e-mail or via the provider's website before your visit.

(+49) +49(0)3312004747​ We are available for you via telephone: weekdays Mon – Fri 9 am – 1 pm and Oct. 31 from 9 am – 1 pm.

Thank you for your enquiry!

In case your enquiry did not result in a booking, we will be getting in touch with you as quickly as possible during our service hours from Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.

We are also glad to answer all of your questions surrounding the State of Brandenburg at (+49)(0)331- 200 47 47. Please send us an e-mail at service@reiseland-brandenburg.de.

Your information and travel agency service Brandenburg

Your request was not successful!

Please try again later. Thank you.

Your information and travel agency service Brandenburg

Online booking


Thank you for visiting www.brandenburg-tourism.com

This website has been developed with the latest technology. Unfortunately, you are using a browser that does not meet the latest technical requirements.

We therefore ask you to use an alternative browser (E.g. Google Chrome, Firefox or Edge) and we hope you enjoy browsing our website.