Berliner Torturm, observation tower

Observation towers
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Second half of the 13th century: The Berlin Torturm (“Gate Tower”) was built on the demolished gable wall of a fieldstone house that had previously burnt down, partially using demolition stones. Access to the tower was once from the top, via the corridor of an adjoining gate house. This opening still exists and was later accessed from the street. Subsidence on the south side caused longitudinal cracks. Despite repairs, the cracks broke open again in 1883. This cast doubt on the stability of the tower, and in 1898 it was fixed with an iron ring
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  • Berliner Torturm Altlandsberg, Foto: Florian Läufer
  • Berliner Torturm Altlandsberg, Foto: Florian Läufer
  • Berliner Torturm Altlandsberg, Foto: Florian Läufer
  • Berliner Torturm Altlandsberg, Foto: Florian Läufer
  • Berliner Torturm Altlandsberg, Foto: Florian Läufer
Circa 1903: The wagon wheel attached to the top failed to attract the storks and fell into disrepair after 30 years – from 1897 onwards the birds preferred to use Strausberg Tower, also known as Storchenturm (“Stork Tower”).

1983: With funding provided by the State Monument Preservation Agency and under the direction of the Kulturbund, the tower was saved from imminent decay.

Since 2000: In 1983 a large ladder was put up inside the tower so it can be climbed. This ladder is still used today to reach the viewing platform. In collaboration with members of the local history association and pupils at the local school, the “wooden” interior of the tower was completely renovated, secured and fitted with electrical power connections in 2003.

2004: Since 2004 it has been possible to climb the tower under supervision: it offers a superb view of the old town, the town wall and the ramparts.

Guided tours of the town are available by prior appointment.
Continue readingcollapse
 
Second half of the 13th century: The Berlin Torturm (“Gate Tower”) was built on the demolished gable wall of a fieldstone house that had previously burnt down, partially using demolition stones. Access to the tower was once from the top, via the corridor of an adjoining gate house. This opening still exists and was later accessed from the street. Subsidence on the south side caused longitudinal cracks. Despite repairs, the cracks broke open again in 1883. This cast doubt on the stability of the tower, and in 1898 it was fixed with an iron ring
Continue readingcollapse
  • Berliner Torturm Altlandsberg, Foto: Florian Läufer
  • Berliner Torturm Altlandsberg, Foto: Florian Läufer
  • Berliner Torturm Altlandsberg, Foto: Florian Läufer
  • Berliner Torturm Altlandsberg, Foto: Florian Läufer
Circa 1903: The wagon wheel attached to the top failed to attract the storks and fell into disrepair after 30 years – from 1897 onwards the birds preferred to use Strausberg Tower, also known as Storchenturm (“Stork Tower”).

1983: With funding provided by the State Monument Preservation Agency and under the direction of the Kulturbund, the tower was saved from imminent decay.

Since 2000: In 1983 a large ladder was put up inside the tower so it can be climbed. This ladder is still used today to reach the viewing platform. In collaboration with members of the local history association and pupils at the local school, the “wooden” interior of the tower was completely renovated, secured and fitted with electrical power connections in 2003.

2004: Since 2004 it has been possible to climb the tower under supervision: it offers a superb view of the old town, the town wall and the ramparts.

Guided tours of the town are available by prior appointment.
Continue readingcollapse

Arrival planner

Berliner Straße 1

15345 Altlandsberg

Weather Today, 21. 5.

20 26
overcast clouds

  • Wednesday
    15 23
  • Thursday
    13 20

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Tourist information

Tourismusverband Seenland Oder-Spree e.V.

Ulmenstraße 15
15526 Bad Saarow

Tel.: +49 (0) 33631-868100
Fax: +49 (0) 33631-868102

Weather Today, 21. 5.

20 26
overcast clouds

  • Wednesday
    15 23
  • Thursday
    13 20

All information, times and prices are regularly checked and updated. Nevertheless, we can not guarantee the accuracy of the data. We recommend that you inquire about the current status by phone / e-mail or via the provider's website before your visit.

(+49) +49(0)331 2004747​ We are available for you via telephone: weekdays Mon – Fri 9 am – 1 pm and Oct. 31 from 9 am – 1 pm.

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