Liebrose Concentration Camp Documentation Centre/Soviet Special Camp No. 6 Jamlitz

Memorials of recent German history
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“As the Jewish prisoners arrived, the camp became an official liquidation camp,” said a political prisoner a year after the first Hungarian Jews from Auschwitz had arrived in Jamlitz in June 1944. The labour camp ‘Arbeitslager Lieberose’ was the second biggest of the 92 satellite camps of the Sachsenhausen concentration camp. It was set up from autumn 1943 for the purpose of having prisoners build a big military training area for members of the Waffen-SS. 4,000 prisoners stayed at the camp by the end of 1944, 90 percent of these were Jews. At a point when millions of Jews had already been murdered, they escaped death in the extermination camps. However, the weak prisoners were subjected to cruel physical labour and brutal abuse by the SS guards. When the camp was shut down in early February 1945, extermination through labour was followed by the mass killing of 1,342 prisoners, who were too weak to be sent on the death march to Sachsenhausen. Here, in the main camp Oranienburg, the SS again selected more than 400 prisoners who had survived the death march with its shootings. These were sent to ‘Station Z’, where they were shot or killed in the gas chamber. Among the people killed were adults as well as children.
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  • Dokumentationsstätte KZ-Außenlager Lieberose, Foto: Ev. KG Lieberose und Land / Berthold Weidner
  • Dokumentationsstätte KZ-Außenlager Lieberose, Foto: Ev. KG Lieberose und Land / Berthold Weidner
From September 1945, the Soviet secret service used the site for its special camp no. 6. German civilians, who were accused of national socialist crimes and active membership in the NSDAP and its subdivisions, as well as of attempted partisan activities against the occupying powers (werewolf), were locked up here until 1947. Among the very diverse prisoners were personalities such as the movie director Gustaf Gründgens, who had been one of the best known actors of the NS era; or Friederike Wieking, the chief of the criminal investigation police of the Third Reich, who had been responsible for the crimes committed in the ‘youth protection camps’ Moringen and Uckermark; or the lawyer Justus Delbrück, who had been involved in the resistance against Hitler and had barely survived the end of the dictatorship. A third of the more than 10,000 prisoners in Jamlitz, including Delbrück, died due to the catastrophic conditions of detention. The remaining prisoners were allocated to other special camps in spring 1947.

Two outdoor exhibitions were set up in 2003 to commemorate the satellite camp and the special Soviet camp.

Literature:
  • Andreas Weigelt, Judenmord im Reichsgebiet. Lieberose: Außenlager des KZ-Sachsenhausen, Berlin 2011.
  • Andreas Weigelt, „Umschulungslager existieren nicht.“ Zur Geschichte des sowjetischen Speziallagers Nr. 6 in Jamlitz 1945-1947, Potsdam 2001.

Left:

  • http://www.die-lager-jamlitz.de

Continue readingcollapse
“As the Jewish prisoners arrived, the camp became an official liquidation camp,” said a political prisoner a year after the first Hungarian Jews from Auschwitz had arrived in Jamlitz in June 1944. The labour camp ‘Arbeitslager Lieberose’ was the second biggest of the 92 satellite camps of the Sachsenhausen concentration camp. It was set up from autumn 1943 for the purpose of having prisoners build a big military training area for members of the Waffen-SS. 4,000 prisoners stayed at the camp by the end of 1944, 90 percent of these were Jews. At a point when millions of Jews had already been murdered, they escaped death in the extermination camps. However, the weak prisoners were subjected to cruel physical labour and brutal abuse by the SS guards. When the camp was shut down in early February 1945, extermination through labour was followed by the mass killing of 1,342 prisoners, who were too weak to be sent on the death march to Sachsenhausen. Here, in the main camp Oranienburg, the SS again selected more than 400 prisoners who had survived the death march with its shootings. These were sent to ‘Station Z’, where they were shot or killed in the gas chamber. Among the people killed were adults as well as children.
Continue readingcollapse
  • Dokumentationsstätte KZ-Außenlager Lieberose, Foto: Ev. KG Lieberose und Land / Berthold Weidner
  • Dokumentationsstätte KZ-Außenlager Lieberose, Foto: Ev. KG Lieberose und Land / Berthold Weidner
From September 1945, the Soviet secret service used the site for its special camp no. 6. German civilians, who were accused of national socialist crimes and active membership in the NSDAP and its subdivisions, as well as of attempted partisan activities against the occupying powers (werewolf), were locked up here until 1947. Among the very diverse prisoners were personalities such as the movie director Gustaf Gründgens, who had been one of the best known actors of the NS era; or Friederike Wieking, the chief of the criminal investigation police of the Third Reich, who had been responsible for the crimes committed in the ‘youth protection camps’ Moringen and Uckermark; or the lawyer Justus Delbrück, who had been involved in the resistance against Hitler and had barely survived the end of the dictatorship. A third of the more than 10,000 prisoners in Jamlitz, including Delbrück, died due to the catastrophic conditions of detention. The remaining prisoners were allocated to other special camps in spring 1947.

Two outdoor exhibitions were set up in 2003 to commemorate the satellite camp and the special Soviet camp.

Literature:
  • Andreas Weigelt, Judenmord im Reichsgebiet. Lieberose: Außenlager des KZ-Sachsenhausen, Berlin 2011.
  • Andreas Weigelt, „Umschulungslager existieren nicht.“ Zur Geschichte des sowjetischen Speziallagers Nr. 6 in Jamlitz 1945-1947, Potsdam 2001.

Left:

  • http://www.die-lager-jamlitz.de

Continue readingcollapse

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Kiefernweg

15868 Lieberose

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